a thing or two
here and there | just another hooligan in Portland, Oregon

 

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literaryjukebox:

Being alone in our present society raises an important question about identity and well-being.

[…]

How have we arrived, in the relatively prosperous developed world, at least, at a cultural moment which values autonomy, personal freedom, fulfillment and human rights, and above all individualism, more highly than they have ever been valued before in human history, but at the same time these autonomous, free, self-fulfilling individuals are terrified of being alone with themselves?

[…]

We live in a society which sees high self-esteem as a proof of well-being, but we do not want to be intimate with this admirable and desirable person.

Sara Maitland in How to Be Alone

Song: “Lonesome” by Dr. Dog

Say “death” and the whole room freezes–
even the couches stop moving,
even the lamps.
Like a squirrel suddenly aware it is being looked at.

Say the word continuously,
and things begin to go forward.
Your life takes on
the jerky texture of an old film strip.

Continue saying it, hold it moment after moment inside the mouth,
it becomes another syllable.
A shopping mall swirls around the corpse of a beetle.

Death is voracious, it swallows all the living.
Life is voracious, it swallows all the dead.
neither is ever satisfied, neither is ever filled,
each swallows and swallows the world.

The grip of life is as strong as the grip of death.

(but the vanished, the vanished beloved, o where?)

Jane Hirshfield - Poem With Two Endings

asylum-art:

Dosshaus: Just Used Cardboard To Create These Magical, Dream-Like Scenes

Artist on Tumblr | on deviantART | Facebook

House of cardboard”, “The Music Room”, "The Writer’s Room"

  • Cardboard, paint and glue, 2014

Artists Zoey Taylor and David Connelly have created the artistic duo Dosshaus. They don’t just create photos, but entire worlds made of cardboard. It’s mesmerizing. 
Connelly and Taylor create large scenes in which they interact with their cardboard creations.
But when you look closer, you’ll see that their creations are most impressive for their details.
The scene “The Writer’s Room” is incredible in the atmosphere it creates.
But when you look at the little items in the scene, you see the work that was involved in each object.
Sometimes their scenes show everyday moments in new and mesmerizing proportions.
It’s amazing that something so realistic can also be so surreal.

magictransistor:

Joan Miró, Hombre con pipa (Homme a la pipe) Óleo sobre lienzo, 1925.

magictransistor:

Joan Miró, Hombre con pipa (Homme a la pipe) Óleo sobre lienzo, 1925.

In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century’s end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. There’s every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn’t happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell